About

Gonzaga Jesuit Community

The spiritual and educational traditions of the Society of Jesus have informed and animated Gonzaga’s mission since its founding in 1821. Today, we are proud to be home to one of only two Jesuit communities in Washington, D.C. 
Gonzaga’s Jesuit Community is thriving—in fact, in January 2017, the number of Jesuits living on Eye Street more than doubled when our community merged with the Leonard Neale House Jesuit Community, which used to be based near Dupont Circle.
 
Together we have become a totally new and vibrant "bunch of friends in the Lord." We eat and relax together, have Mass weekly together, pray and share faith together. We even share house jobs—from buying groceries to keeping the house in shape and receiving guests.
 
Part of this renewed vibrancy comes from the fact that the men living on Eye Street now perform a diverse array of ministries that serve many different communities. Historically, the Jesuits who lived here mainly served Gonzaga. Now, though we are located on Eye Street and fully committed to the mission of Gonzaga, most of us do not work at the school.
 
Below are descriptions of the 19 Jesuits who are based at Gonzaga. Of course, these short descriptions do not tell the whole story of who they are and they we do. As a local Jesuit Community we exist to embody and carry out the worldwide mission of the Society of Jesus. How? Through the service of faith and reconciliation, and the promotion of justice. This mission—carried out not only at Gonzaga, the Father McKenna Center, and the Washington Jesuit Academy, but also in the city of D.C. and around the world—drives us forward together. It ignites our common passion and commitment to making Ignatian Spirituality available to anyone and everyone who seeks it.

Sincerely,

Father Gasper (Gap) LoBiondo
Superior of the Gonzaga Jesuit Community
We eat and relax together, have Mass weekly together, pray and share faith together.

Meet The Gonzaga Jesuit Community

Educating young men in the Jesuit tradition since 1821